Search Images Maps Play YouTube Gmail Drive Calendar More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS20050249337 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 11/083,070
Publication date10 Nov 2005
Filing date17 Mar 2005
Priority date18 Mar 2004
Also published asEP1578073A1, EP1585251A1, EP1585276A1, EP1585277A1, US7734731, US8001182, US8495163, US8516045, US8566311, US9124643, US20050208941, US20050210062, US20050223070, US20050232401, US20050234993, US20130254285
Publication number083070, 11083070, US 2005/0249337 A1, US 2005/249337 A1, US 20050249337 A1, US 20050249337A1, US 2005249337 A1, US 2005249337A1, US-A1-20050249337, US-A1-2005249337, US2005/0249337A1, US2005/249337A1, US20050249337 A1, US20050249337A1, US2005249337 A1, US2005249337A1
InventorsJoann Ordille, Michael Stewart
Original AssigneeOrdille Joann J, Stewart Michael L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for just in time education
US 20050249337 A1
Abstract
Methods and apparatus are provided for just-in-time education. The just-in-time education provides instruction or reminders of tasks to be completed, preparations to be made or a sequence of actions to follow in response to an urgent notification. Information associated with an event, such as an emergency event, is provided to one or more recipients, in response to an occurrence of the event. The information comprises a listing of a plurality of tasks to be completed by the recipient(s), for example, in the form of a checklist or a tutorial. A notification message containing the information is generated and processed based on a communication flow expression. The recipient(s) can respond with an indication of completed tasks or a status update.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(31)
1. A method for providing information associated with an event to one or more recipients, said method comprising the steps of:
obtaining said information associated with said event, wherein said information comprises a listing of a plurality of tasks to be completed by said one or more recipients;
in response to an occurrence of said event, generating a notification message containing said information;
processing said notification message based on a communication flow expression indicating how said notification message should be processed; and
sending said notification message to each of said one or more recipients.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein said information is a checklist of items related to said event.
3. The method of claim 1, wherein said information is a tutorial containing educational information related to said event.
4. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of generating a visualization of one or more pending tasks.
5. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of generating a visualization of one or more completed tasks.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein said information identifies one or more action items for an individual to complete.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein said event is an emergency event.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein said information contains one or more of tasks to be completed, preparations to be made, or a sequence of actions to follow.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein said information is provided to said one or more recipients in accordance with preference information specified by each of said one or more recipients.
10. The method of claim 9, wherein said preference information includes one or more of at least one media preference and at least one human language type preference.
11. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of receiving at least one response to said notification message.
12. The method of claim 11, wherein said response to said notification message identifies one or more completed tasks.
13. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of receiving at least one status update from at least one of said one or more recipients.
14. A method for providing information associated with an event to one or more recipients, said method comprising the steps of:
obtaining said information associated with said event, wherein said information comprises a listing of a plurality of tasks to be completed by said one or more recipients;
generating a notification message containing said information;
processing said notification message based on a communication flow expression indicating how said notification message should be processed;
sending said notification message to each of said one or more recipients; and
receiving at least one response to said notification message from one or more of said recipients indicating at least one of said tasks that have been completed.
15. The method of claim 14, further comprising the step of sending one or more follow up notification messages to each of said one or more recipients indicating at least one of said plurality of tasks that remain to be completed.
16. The method of claim 14, wherein said information is a checklist of items related to said event.
17. The method of claim 14, wherein said information is a tutorial containing educational information related to said event.
18. The method of claim 14, further comprising the step of generating a visualization of one or more pending or completed tasks.
19. The method of claim 14, wherein said event is an emergency event.
20. The method of claim 14, wherein said information contains one or more of tasks to be completed, preparations to be made, or a sequence of actions to follow.
21. The method of claim 14, wherein said information is provided to said one or more recipients in accordance with preference information specified by each of said one or more recipients.
22. The method of claim 14, further comprising the step of receiving at least one status update from at least one of said one or more recipients.
23. An apparatus for providing information associated with an event to one or more recipients, said apparatus comprising:
a memory; and
at least one processor, coupled to the memory, operative to:
obtain said information associated with said event, wherein said information comprises a listing of a plurality of tasks to be completed by said one or more recipients;
in response to an occurrence of said event, generate a notification message containing said information;
process said notification message based on a communication flow expression indicating how said notification message should be processed; and
send said notification message to each of said one or more recipients.
24. The apparatus of claim 23, wherein said information is a checklist of items related to said event or a tutorial containing educational information related to said event.
25. The apparatus of claim 23, processor is further configured to generate a visualization of one or more pending tasks.
26. The apparatus of claim 23, processor is further configured to generate a visualization of one or more completed tasks.
27. The apparatus of claim 23, wherein said information identifies one or more action items for an individual to complete.
28. The apparatus of claim 23, wherein said information contains one or more of tasks to be completed, preparations to be made, or a sequence of actions to follow.
29. The apparatus of claim 23, processor is further configured to receive at least one response to said notification message.
30. The apparatus of claim 29, wherein said response to said notification message identifies one or more completed tasks.
31. The apparatus of claim 23, processor is further configured to receive at least one status update from at least one of said one or more recipients.
Description
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/554,232, filed Mar. 18, 2004, and is related to U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/184,236, filed Jun. 26, 2002, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response;” and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/184,325, filed Jun. 26, 2002, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response Based on Communication Flow Expressions,” and U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response Based On Communication Flow Expressions Having Dynamic Context,” U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Dynamically Adjusting Membership of a Communication Flow Expression,” and U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Subscribing to Dynamic Attributes,” each filed contemporaneously herewith, and each incorporated by reference herein.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to communication methods and systems, and more particularly, to methods and systems that provide educational information associated with an event, such an emergency, to one or more users.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    Applications often need to contact people and have requirements for how the contact is done and what responses, if any, are collected. For example, an application may need to contact someone immediately in a crisis or may want to remind someone of a task at an appropriate time. Recipients, on the other hand, have their own preferences about how and when they are contacted. For example, recipients may want particular people, such as a family member, to be given more flexibility in establishing real-time contact.
  • [0004]
    A number of notification systems have been proposed or developed to enable applications to communicate with one or more recipients. U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/184,236, filed Jun. 26, 2002, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response;” and U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/184,325, filed Jun. 26, 2002, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response Based on Communication Flow Expressions,” disclose notification and response systems. Generally, the disclosed notification and response systems (i) send requests to one or more recipients, using the medium specified by each individual recipient in accordance with the individual's preferences; (ii) collect and processes responses; and (iii) forward the responses to their final destination by means of the medium specified by the final destination in accordance with the final destination's preferences.
  • [0005]
    In addition, recent advances in telecommunication systems permit important messages to be provided to an entire community during an emergency. For example, a number of techniques have been proposed or suggested to automatically inform the public of an emergency situation, or to provide a public service message. Typically, such community notification systems maintain a database containing a telephone number or electronic mail address (or both) of each member of the relevant community. Thereafter, in the event of an emergency affecting the community, a recorded message is sent to each specified telephone number or electronic mail address. For example, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,559,867 and 5,912,947, assigned to Sigma/Micro Corp., of Indianapolis, Ind., describe a public notification system that automatically initiates telephone calls to telephone numbers identified in a database of users. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 6,463,462, assigned to Dialogic Communications Corporation of Franklin, Tenn., describes an automated system for delivering messages to a community of users. For example, if there is an accident at an industrial site in a particular community, a community notification system can automatically call all residents within a certain radius of the site and play a recorded message providing information about the emergency.
  • [0006]
    While such community notification systems can be effectively employed to notify a large number of people in the event of a catastrophic emergency or another event affecting an entire community, they cannot effectively notify an individual or a small group of people of how to act in the case of a particular event. In addition, currently available community notification systems provide the same message to all community members using static contact information, and are unable to tailor the message to a variety of roles with different action requirements. Existing work in emergency and urgent notification and response applications have focused on informing recipients of the emergency and directing them to a particular action.
  • [0007]
    A need therefore exists for methods and apparatus that provide educational information associated with an event, such as an emergency or an urgent situation requiring a detailed response, to recipients. A further need exists for methods and apparatus that remind recipients of tasks to be completed, preparations to made, or a sequence of actions to follow.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0008]
    Generally, methods and apparatus are provided for just-in-time education. The just-in-time education provides instruction or reminders of tasks to be completed, preparations to be made or a sequence of actions to follow in response to an urgent notification. Information associated with an event, such as an emergency event, is provided to one or more recipients, in response to an occurrence of the event. The information comprises a listing of a plurality of tasks to be completed by the recipient(s), for example, in the form of a checklist or a tutorial. In response to an occurrence of the event, a notification message containing the information is generated and processed based on a communication flow expression. The notification message is sent to each of the recipients. The recipient(s) can respond with an indication of completed tasks or a status update.
  • [0009]
    A more complete understanding of the present invention, as well as further features and advantages of the present invention, will be obtained by reference to the following detailed description and drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1 illustrates a notification and response system incorporating features of the present invention; and
  • [0011]
    FIG. 2 illustrates the distribution of one or more checklists during different phases of a communication, in accordance with the present invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0012]
    The present invention provides just-in-time education for instructing or reminding recipients of tasks to be completed, preparations to be made or a sequence of actions to follow in response to an urgent notification. The instructions can come in the form of a checklist or, as an alternative, as an online tutorial for the recipient.
  • [0013]
    The just-in-time education can also be used to provide for education for non-urgent tasks at times convenient to the recipient, as would be apparent to a person of ordinary skill in the art. In addition, the just-in-time education of the present invention can be used by individuals to send reminders to themselves of task lists that need to be completed. In yet another variation of the present invention, the checklists associated with the just-in-time education can serve as action items for an individual to complete.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary notification and response system 100 incorporating features of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 1, the notification and response system 100 can provide one or more checklists 110 containing a checklist of tasks (and optionally their sequencing) to one or more recipients 120-1 through 120-N (hereinafter, collectively referred to as recipients 120) via one or more media. The checklist 120 can take the form of an HTML list of items to be acknoweldged as completed (checked) or a list that can be reviewed by telephone and acknowledged as completed. Similarly, lists may be conveyed by other media such as IM, and responses can be returned via a method appropriate to those media, or via an alternate media such as the telephone.
  • [0015]
    The checklist(s) may be retrieved, for example, from a checklist database 150 that stores various checklists on various topics, for example, indexed by emergency type. In a further variation shown in FIG. 1, the content 145 for the checklist 110 can be provided by an application 140 that is requesting the notification and response system 100 to distribute the checklist notification.
  • [0016]
    The exemplary notification and response system 100 may be embodied, for example, as the Xui™ notification and response system, commercially available from Avaya, Inc. of Basking Ridge, N.J., as modified herein to provide the features and functions of the present invention. The Xui™ notification and response system, as well as the processing of communication flows by the notification and response system 100 in accordance with a communication flow expression, is described, for example, in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/184,236, filed Jun. 26, 2002, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response;” U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/184,325, filed Jun. 26, 2002, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response Based on Communication Flow Expressions,” or U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______, filed contemporaneously herewith and entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response Based on Communication Flow Expressions Having Dynamic Context,” each incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0017]
    Generally, as shown in FIG. 1, the notification and response system 100 enables one or more applications 140 to communicate with one or more recipients 120 by a number of different media, such as electronic mail, telephone, web page, pager or facsimile. Generally, the notification and response system 100 (i) sends one or more requests containing, for example, a checklist 110, to one or more recipients 120, using the medium specified by each individual recipient 120 in accordance with the individual's preferences (and recorded for example, in a recipient preference and role database (not shown)); (ii) collects and processes responses to the request; and (iii) forwards the responses to their final destination by means of the medium specified by the final destination in accordance with the final destination's preferences. Roles provide a way of categorizing users and what they are allowed to do. The recipient preference and role database also allows roles that are specified in a communication flow to be resolved to individual recipient names at the time the requests are transmitted.
  • [0018]
    The application 140 can create notification requests and submit them to the notification and response system 100. The notification requests must contain a communication flow to execute. Once the notification and response system 100 receives a notification request, the notification and response system 100 executes the communication flow logic to notify the recipients 120 and collect their responses.
  • [0019]
    As discussed hereinafter, the checklist 110 can be delivered for immediate completion and acknowledgment. The checklist 110 can be received by the recipients 120, and then acknowledged later by call back via phone or contact back to the notification and response system 100 by the web, or by other appropriate means, such as an instant message (IM).
  • [0020]
    In various implementations, the checklist 110 can first be delivered as a set of one or more instructions, with a follow up message to ascertain the level of completion of the instructions. The checklist 110 can also be delivered with an option for immediate or subsequent follow up at the discretion of the recipient, using appropriate communication flow expression functionality, as provided by the notification and response system 100. Further, the list can be delivered and the response can indicate that some, but not all, items have been completed. In this manner, subsequent follow up messages can ask only about uncompleted items.
  • [0021]
    In a further variation, the checklists 110 could convey a group of tasks from a database of tasks, each task with its own unique identifier, that need to be completed in a disaster or other urgent response scenario. As the tasks are acknoweldged as complete, the database is updated to reflect the progress made on the entire set of tasks. When the response scenario relates to an urgent matter that is distributed in geography or within a building, a visualization of the tasks pending and completed can be presented on a map as updates come in to allow a urgent response center to track progress.
  • [0022]
    In one exemplary use of communication flows to support checklists, a single user, user1, is sent a checklist 110 containing a number of items, n. The communication flow sends the user a checklist, collects a response comprised of checks for completed items, and reminds the user every hour until all items are checked. The application 140 may supply the content 145 of the checklist 110 and return a total running count of all items that have been checked. The application 140 can maintain the count in a number of ways. One exemplary way would be to count the number of checked items in the responses so far, and then add the count of newly checked items to it. The total is returned in the response in the attribute totalchecked. An exemplary communication flow for this example may be expressed as:
    (user1 OR THIS AFTER +01:00)? number(response(‘totalchecked’)) = n?
  • [0023]
    Extending this example, several users, user1 through userk, are sent checklists 110 of n items. The users each receive reminders every hour until they complete all their checklist items. In the following exemplary communication flow, labels and a group of IF-THEN-ELSE expressions are used to separate the communication flow into sub-communication flows for reminding each user until the user has completed the checklist, as follows:
    (IF ? label(‘user1’) ? THEN ( user1 OR THIS AFTER +01:00)
    ELSE IF ? label(‘user2’) ? THEN ( user2 OR THIS AFTER +01:00)
    . . .
    ELSE IF ? label(‘userk’) ? THEN ( userk OR THIS AFTER +01:00)
    ELSE BROADCAST { [user1] THIS, [user2] THIS, . . . , [userk]
    THIS})?
    number(response(‘totalchecked’)) = n?
  • [0024]
    The application 140 could generate individual requests for each role in an urgent response, as discussed further below in conjunction with FIG. 2. Each request to a separate role might have a different number of checklist items. In another exemplary use of communication flows, the application 140 could generate one communication flow for different checklists 110 to a variety of roles. In this communication flow, labels and a group of IF-THEN-ELSE expressions are used to separate the communication flow into sub-communication flows for reminding the individuals in each role until they have completed the checklist for the role. Each role may have a different number of checklist items. Individuals who fill the roles are found by a search of the recipient preference and role database where, in this case, “role” corresponds to an organizational unit. Since multiple people may respond to checklists 110 for the role, the communication flow indepedently checks each checklist item by name to be sure that it has been done. This avoids race conditions that could result if multiple members of the role report that the same item is complete. Since the checklists 110 are different for each role, the communication flow tests that the complete set of checklist items is done for each role, as follows:
    IF ? label(‘ROLE1’)?
    THEN (OR {SEARCH (‘ou=Role1’), THIS AFTER +01:00} ) ? test1 ?
    ELSE IF ? label(‘ROLE2’)?
    THEN ( OR {SEARCH (‘ou=Role2’), THIS AFTER +01:00} ) ? test2?
    . . .
    ELSE IF ? label(‘ROLEn’)?
    THEN (OR {SEARCH (‘ou=Rolen’), THIS AFTER +01:00} )? testn?
    else broadcast {[ROLE1] THIS, [ROLE2] THIS, . . . , [ROLEn] THIS})?
    true?
  • [0025]
    where each test includes checklist names itemsij for the role, i, and the number, j, of the checklist item for that role. For example, testi for ROLEi with k total checklist items follows:
    (boolean(data(‘xui:response[xui:labels/xui:label=”ROLEi”][itemi1 =
    ”true”]’))||
    response(′itemi1′) = =′true′)) &&
    (boolean(data(‘xui:response[xui:labels/xui:label=“ROLEi”]
    [itemi2=“true”]’))
    ||
    response(′itemi2′) = =′true′)) &&
    . . .
    (boolean(data(‘xui:response[xui:labels/xui:label=”ROLEi”][itemik =
    ”true”]’))||
    response(′itemik′) = =′true′))
  • [0026]
    In other examples of just-in-time education, the technique could be applied to surveying a population within a geography or searching a geographic area, e.g., for a missing child, visualization could be used to track survey responses as they come in by updating a map to reflect aggregates of survey responses by geography, or search areas completed or clues found. Other kinds of visualizations of task completions unrelated to geography are possible, such as visualizing the completion of a hierarchircally structured task or the completion of a long list with color.
  • [0027]
    The just-in-time education of the present invention can also be used to provide automated flash card type training comprised of prompts for answers to questions, or items to acknowlege reviewing. This is particularly useful when coupled with the ability to schedule delivery of notifications at a convenient time, such as the scheduling facilities provided by the Avaya Xui Notification and Response System™. Just-in-time education can be further used by individuals to send reminders to themselves of lists of tasks to be accomplished, such as a shopping list. Delivery could be scheduled for the expected time of shopping, or the individual could access a web or voice portal, similar to that available in the Avaya Xui Notification and Response System, when access to the task list is desired.
  • [0028]
    When more sophisticated training is necessary, the just-in-time education reminder could link the recipient to a sophisticated tutorial system via phone or web. In this case, the tutorial system would generate the response to the notification and response system. The response would include an indication of whether follow up was necessary, perhaps a time for the next follow up, and an identifier to be conveyed to the tutorial system when follow up occurs. The identifier would allow the tutorial system to continue instruction from the appropiate point.
  • [0029]
    Checklists can be generated and delivered using the techniques of the Avaya Notification and Response System. Follow ups can be automatically scheduled using the techniques of the Avaya Notification and Response System. Results can be automatically posted to a tracking database as they come using techniques in the Avaya Notification and Response System. This particular application has additional novelty in the combination of these features to affect a Just in Time Education System.
  • [0030]
    In a hospital or medical setting, the checklists 110 of the present invention can remind recipients of tasks to be completed, preparations to made, or a sequence of actions to follow in certain situations. For example, a checklist of items can be distributed to the appropriate personnel in the event a child is abducted in the hospital and a lock down is required. In addition, if a patient is scheduled for a medical procedure, a pre-procedure checklist of things the patient must do prior to surgery can be sent, for example, 24, 12, 4, and 1 hours before surgery, identifying different things that need to be done. The just-in-time education of the present invention can also be used, for example, to notify the family or parents when important information becomes available, or to locate them, so that a staff person can speak with them.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 2 illustrates the distribution of one or more checklists during different phases of a communication, in accordance with the present invention. For a more detailed discussion of the use of labels in a notification and response system 100, see U.S. patent application Ser. No. ______, entitled “Method and Apparatus for Automatic Notification and Response Based on Communication Flow Expressions Having Dynamic Context,” incorporated by reference herein.
  • [0032]
    As shown in FIG. 2, assume an application 140 has four different types of interactions that are planned with recipients 120 depending on the phase of the communication or other criteria. In FIG. 2, a first group is contacted during step 210 and asked to confirm evacuation, a second group is sent checklists 110 of actions to follow during step 220, a third group is asked for their location, condition and whether they need assistance during steps 230 and 232, and a fourth group receives reports on the condition of the third group during step 240. The communication flow subexpression for contacting each group can be preceded by a label identifying their role in the communication. The application can then use the label to determine which interaction to have with the recipient.
  • [0033]
    System and Article of Manufacture Details
  • [0034]
    As is known in the art, the methods and apparatus discussed herein may be distributed as an article of manufacture that itself comprises a computer readable medium having computer readable code means embodied thereon. The computer readable program code means is operable, in conjunction with a computer system, to carry out all or some of the steps to perform the methods or create the apparatuses discussed herein. The computer readable medium may be a recordable medium (e.g., floppy disks, hard drives, compact disks, or memory cards) or may be a transmission medium (e.g., a network comprising fiber-optics, the world-wide web, cables, or a wireless channel using time-division multiple access, code-division multiple access, or other radio-frequency channel). Any medium known or developed that can store information suitable for use with a computer system may be used. The computer-readable code means is any mechanism for allowing a computer to read instructions and data, such as magnetic variations on a magnetic media or height variations on the surface of a compact disk.
  • [0035]
    The computer systems and servers described herein each contain a memory that will configure associated processors to implement the methods, steps, and functions disclosed herein. The memories could be distributed or local and the processors could be distributed or singular. The memories could be implemented as an electrical, magnetic or optical memory, or any combination of these or other types of storage devices. Moreover, the term “memory” should be construed broadly enough to encompass any information able to be read from or written to an address in the addressable space accessed by an associated processor. With this definition, information on a network is still within a memory because the associated processor can retrieve the information from the network.
  • [0036]
    It is to be understood that the embodiments and variations shown and described herein are merely illustrative of the principles of this invention and that various modifications may be implemented by those skilled in the art without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.
Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5509000 *10 Jun 199416 Apr 1996Motorola, Inc.Method and apparatus for routing information in a communication system
US5742668 *6 Jun 199521 Apr 1998Bell Communications Research, Inc.Electronic massaging network
US5812865 *4 Mar 199622 Sep 1998Xerox CorporationSpecifying and establishing communication data paths between particular media devices in multiple media device computing systems based on context of a user or users
US5859967 *9 Jul 199612 Jan 1999Faxsav IncorporatedMethod and system for relaying communications from authorized users
US5892906 *19 Jul 19966 Apr 1999Chou; Wayne W.Apparatus and method for preventing theft of computer devices
US5983265 *20 Oct 19979 Nov 1999Paradigm4, Inc.System for controlling electronic messaging protocol between plurality of computer system by using identical electronic messaging system
US5999978 *31 Oct 19977 Dec 1999Sun Microsystems, Inc.Distributed system and method for controlling access to network resources and event notifications
US6098099 *21 Apr 19981 Aug 2000International Business Machines CorporationThird-party notification by network directory server
US6112246 *22 Oct 199829 Aug 2000Horbal; Mark T.System and method for accessing information from a remote device and providing the information to a client workstation
US6158007 *17 Sep 19975 Dec 2000Jahanshah MorehSecurity system for event based middleware
US6173310 *30 Jun 19999 Jan 2001Microstrategy, Inc.System and method for automatic transmission of on-line analytical processing system report output
US6195703 *24 Jun 199827 Feb 2001Emc CorporationDynamic routing for performance partitioning in a data processing network
US6205148 *8 Sep 199720 Mar 2001Fujitsu LimitedApparatus and a method for selecting an access router's protocol of a plurality of the protocols for transferring a packet in a communication system
US6442565 *13 Aug 199927 Aug 2002Hiddenmind Technology, Inc.System and method for transmitting data content in a computer network
US6446114 *2 Oct 20003 Sep 2002At&T Corp.Messaging agent and method for retrieving and consolidating messages
US6457046 *30 Dec 199724 Sep 2002Fujitsu LimitedInformation providing apparatus for server and computer-readable recording medium storing information providing program for server
US6463462 *2 Feb 19998 Oct 2002Dialogic Communications CorporationAutomated system and method for delivery of messages and processing of message responses
US6557054 *20 Apr 200029 Apr 2003Richard R. ReismanMethod and system for distributing updates by presenting directory of software available for user installation that is not already installed on user station
US6633630 *12 Sep 199814 Oct 2003Cranberry Properties, LlcSystem for integrated electronic communications
US6643684 *8 Oct 19984 Nov 2003International Business Machines CorporationSender- specified delivery customization
US6643705 *29 Mar 19994 Nov 2003Microsoft CorporationRouting of electronic messages using a routing map and a stateful script engine
US6654770 *10 Jan 200225 Nov 2003Mycarstats.Com, LlcAutomobile safety and maintenance information systems and methods and related services
US6671715 *21 Jan 200030 Dec 2003Microstrategy, Inc.System and method for automatic, real-time delivery of personalized informational and transactional data to users via high throughput content delivery device
US6680943 *1 Oct 199920 Jan 2004Nortel Networks LimitedEstablishing bi-directional communication sessions across a communications network
US6687742 *31 May 20003 Feb 2004Toshiba Tec Kabushiki KaishaCommunication control method for electronic mail system
US6689742 *25 Feb 200010 Feb 2004Chancellors, Masters And Scholars Of The University Of OxfordNY-ESO-1 peptide derivatives, and uses thereof
US6868498 *25 Aug 200015 Mar 2005Peter L. KatsikasSystem for eliminating unauthorized electronic mail
US6886043 *28 Jun 200026 Apr 2005Nortel Networks LimitedCommunications network
US6910070 *24 Jan 200021 Jun 2005Oracle International CorporationMethods and systems for asynchronous notification of database events
US6919792 *19 Oct 199819 Jul 2005Thomson Licensing Inc.Control device and method in a system of household appliances
US6965917 *30 Dec 199915 Nov 2005Comverse Ltd.System and method for notification of an event
US7016477 *9 Jun 200321 Mar 2006Bellsouth Intellectual Property CorporationMethod of notifying a party of an emergency
US7032030 *10 Mar 200018 Apr 2006John David CodignottoMessage publishing system and method
US7219153 *2 Dec 200215 May 2007Cisco Technology, Inc.Methods and apparatus for distributing content
US7372833 *26 Apr 200113 May 2008Nokia CorporationResource allocation in packet network
US7558951 *2 Dec 20047 Jul 2009Dw Holdings, Inc.System and method for secure transactions over a network
US7577581 *31 Oct 200018 Aug 2009Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method for targeting promotions to individual associated with a vehicle
US20010018718 *7 Mar 200130 Aug 2001Ludtke Harold AaronMedia manager for controlling autonomous media devices within a network environment and managing the flow and format of data between the devices
US20010046234 *4 Apr 200129 Nov 2001Hemant AgrawalMethod and apparatus for S.I.P./H. 323 interworking
US20020035607 *23 May 200121 Mar 2002Daniel CheckowayE-mail gateway system
US20020072348 *13 Dec 200013 Jun 2002Motorola, Inc.Mobile personal security monitoring service
US20020072966 *7 Dec 200013 Jun 2002Eldering Charles A.System for providing targeted advertisements using advertiser-specific target groups
US20020099586 *20 Nov 200125 Jul 2002National Britannia Group Ltd.Method, system, and computer program product for risk assessment and risk management
US20020103850 *31 Jan 20011 Aug 2002Moyer Stanley L.System and method for out-sourcing the functionality of session initiation protocol (SIP) user agents to proxies
US20020103898 *31 Jan 20011 Aug 2002Moyer Stanley L.System and method for using session initiation protocol (SIP) to communicate with networked appliances
US20020112073 *27 Apr 200115 Aug 2002Melampy Patrick J.System and method for assisting in controlling real-time transport protocol flow through multiple networks via media flow routing
US20020116242 *22 Feb 200122 Aug 2002Vercellone James J.Emergency response synchronization matrix
US20020116336 *5 Feb 200222 Aug 2002Athanassios DiacakisMethod and device for displaying contact information in a presence and availability management system
US20020169839 *1 Feb 200214 Nov 2002Bernel GoldbergMethod and system for modifying the content of e-mail transmissions based on customization settings
US20020184521 *22 Oct 20015 Dec 2002Microsoft CorporationAuthorizing a requesting entity to operate upon data structures
US20030004766 *22 Mar 20022 Jan 2003Ford Motor CompanyMethod for implementing a best practice idea
US20030014297 *10 Jul 200116 Jan 2003International Business Machines CorporationAutomated location-based disruption recovery and surrogate selection service
US20030018771 *4 Mar 200223 Jan 2003Computer Associates Think, Inc.Method and apparatus for generating and recognizing speech as a user interface element in systems and network management
US20030055829 *20 Sep 200120 Mar 2003Rajit KamboMethod and apparatus for automatic notification of database events
US20030093327 *13 Nov 200115 May 2003Bellsouth Intellectual Property CorporationSystems and methods for processing an electronic request to purchase goods or services
US20030119531 *21 Dec 200126 Jun 2003Patton Charles M.Dynamic selection of avatar policies based on physical device location and derived user control
US20030135567 *11 Jun 200217 Jul 2003Mail Registry, Inc.Systems and methods for automatically forwarding electronic mail when the recipient is otherwise unknown
US20030193558 *10 Apr 200216 Oct 2003International Business Machines CorporationMedia-enhanced greetings and/or responses in communication systems
US20030195698 *12 May 200316 Oct 2003Jones M. KellyNotification systems and methods with purpose message in notifications
US20030204431 *29 Apr 200230 Oct 2003Robert Thomas Mitchell IngmanImmediate next task dispatch system and method
US20030229722 *11 Jun 200211 Dec 2003Siemens Information And Communication Networks, Inc.Methods and apparatus for processing an instant message
US20040003058 *26 Jun 20021 Jan 2004Nokia, Inc.Integration of service registration and discovery in networks
US20040006606 *31 Mar 20038 Jan 2004Len MarottaSystem and method for cataloging advertising stored online
US20040015371 *16 Jul 200322 Jan 2004Zachary ThomasSystem and method for managing job applicant data
US20040015778 *7 Mar 200322 Jan 2004Catherine BrittonElectronic healthcare management form creation
US20040064387 *30 Sep 20021 Apr 2004Clarke William D.Customized event messaging in an electronic bill presentment and payment system
US20040095939 *11 Nov 200320 May 2004Jin YangMethod and apparatus for telecommunications using internet protocol
US20040225733 *6 May 200311 Nov 2004Kaj TesinkMulticasting notification system
US20050021383 *25 Jul 200327 Jan 2005Fliess Kevin V.Dynamic role generator
US20050086469 *17 Oct 200321 Apr 2005Microsoft CorporationScalable, fault tolerant notification method
US20050171958 *8 Apr 20024 Aug 2005Qingwen ChengMethod and system for implementing policies, resources and privileges for using services in LDAP
US20050262016 *11 Feb 200524 Nov 2005Mt One, Inc.Integrated on-line system for identifying and valuing foreclosure properties
US20060056628 *30 Jul 200316 Mar 2006International Business Machines CorporationMethods, apparatus and computer programs for processing alerts and auditing in a publish/subscribe system
US20060067309 *24 Oct 200530 Mar 2006Zhakov Vyacheslav ICall transfer using session initiation protocol (SIP)
US20060253585 *11 Jul 20069 Nov 2006Fein Gene SMethod, apparatus and program product providing business processes using media identification and tracking of associated user preferences
US20070168550 *6 Feb 200719 Jul 2007Yi-Min WangSummary-based routing for content-based event distribution networks
US20070179828 *2 Apr 20072 Aug 2007Alex ElkinMethod and system for top-down business process definition and execution
US20070180490 *1 Jul 20042 Aug 2007Renzi Silvio JSystem and method for policy management
US20070299685 *20 Jul 200727 Dec 2007Microsoft CorporationMethods and Systems for Generating Electronic Program Guides
US20080313003 *1 Apr 200218 Dec 2008Racca Felix GDesigning business processes using parametric roles
US20090110159 *31 Dec 200830 Apr 2009Rohit Satish KalbagMessage delivery using a voice mail system
US20090110174 *31 Dec 200830 Apr 2009Worldcom, Inc.Caller treatment in a sip network
US20090201919 *30 Mar 200913 Aug 2009Web Telephony Llc.System for providing hosted telephone services to a subscriber via the internet
US20090204977 *30 Mar 200913 Aug 2009Globestar SystemsEvent management system
US20100064020 *18 Nov 200911 Mar 2010Frank Michael WeyerMethod, apparatus and business system for online communication with online and offline recipients
US20110047078 *2 Nov 201024 Feb 2011Intertrust Technologies Corp.Trusted Infrastructure Support Systems, Methods and Techniques for Secure Electronic Commerce Electronic Transactions and Rights Management
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US789512827 Feb 200722 Feb 2011Xerox CorporationSelf-training and self-testing systems and methods
US20080208779 *27 Feb 200728 Aug 2008Diane DriscollSelf-training and self-testing systems and methods
US20100042912 *11 Jun 200918 Feb 2010Eva WhitakerReminder and notification system for a parent
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/88.12, 705/325, 705/326
International ClassificationH04L12/18, H04W4/06, H04M11/00, G06F15/16, G06F15/173, H04W4/22, H04L29/08, H04M1/64, H04L12/58, H04M3/533, G06F17/00, H04M3/46, H04M3/487, G06Q30/00, G06F17/24, G06F17/30, H04M3/42, G09B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04W76/007, H04M2242/04, H04M3/53383, H04M3/53375, H04M3/4874, H04L67/306, H04L67/303, H04L51/24, H04L51/14, H04L12/1895, H04L12/185, H04L12/18, G09B5/00, G06Q50/265, G06Q50/205, G06Q10/10, G06F17/248, H04L67/30, H04M3/42, H04L67/24, H04W4/22, H04W4/06, H04M3/465, H04M3/46, G06Q30/00, H04L51/04, H04L67/22
European ClassificationG06Q10/10, H04M3/46M, H04L29/08N29, H04L29/08N23, H04L12/18Y, H04L12/18, G06Q30/00, H04M3/487N2, H04L12/58G, H04M3/46, G06F17/24V, H04L12/58N, H04M3/533S2, H04L12/58B, G06Q50/205, G06Q50/265, H04L51/04, H04M3/42, G09B5/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
19 Jul 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: AVAYA TECHNOLOGY CORP., NEW JERSEY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ORDILLE, JOANN J.;REEL/FRAME:016792/0519
Effective date: 20050607
27 Nov 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: CITIBANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:AVAYA, INC.;AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC;OCTEL COMMUNICATIONS LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020156/0149
Effective date: 20071026
Owner name: CITIBANK, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT,NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:AVAYA, INC.;AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC;OCTEL COMMUNICATIONS LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020156/0149
Effective date: 20071026
28 Nov 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: CITICORP USA, INC., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT, NEW Y
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:AVAYA, INC.;AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC;OCTEL COMMUNICATIONS LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020166/0705
Effective date: 20071026
Owner name: CITICORP USA, INC., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT,NEW YO
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNORS:AVAYA, INC.;AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC;OCTEL COMMUNICATIONS LLC;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:020166/0705
Effective date: 20071026
26 Jun 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: AVAYA INC, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: REASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNORS:AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC;AVAYA LICENSING LLC;REEL/FRAME:021156/0287
Effective date: 20080625
Owner name: AVAYA INC,NEW JERSEY
Free format text: REASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNORS:AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC;AVAYA LICENSING LLC;REEL/FRAME:021156/0287
Effective date: 20080625
12 May 2009ASAssignment
Owner name: AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC, NEW JERSEY
Free format text: CONVERSION FROM CORP TO LLC;ASSIGNOR:AVAYA TECHNOLOGY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:022677/0550
Effective date: 20050930
Owner name: AVAYA TECHNOLOGY LLC,NEW JERSEY
Free format text: CONVERSION FROM CORP TO LLC;ASSIGNOR:AVAYA TECHNOLOGY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:022677/0550
Effective date: 20050930
22 Feb 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST, NA, AS NOTES COLLAT
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AVAYA INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:025863/0535
Effective date: 20110211
10 Jan 2013ASAssignment
Owner name: THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A., P
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AVAYA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:029608/0256
Effective date: 20121221
13 Mar 2013ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A., THE,
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:AVAYA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:030083/0639
Effective date: 20130307